Hypnosis for Sporting Excellence (Online) CPD – Trevor Eddolls

Continuing Professional Development (CPD) available for CPHT Graduates

Date: Sunday 14th June 2021
Timings: 10am to 5pm
Location: Online Zoom Conferencing
Lecturer: Trevor Eddolls
Hosted by: CPHT Bristol
Contact: 0117 317 9278 or info@cphtbristol.co.uk

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Once booked if you have not received your Zoom link by Friday 11th June please contact us.


About the Course

The aim of this course:
To understand how to help your clients improve their Sports Performance through the use of Hypnosis. We explore how the brain works and different techniques of visualisation and relaxation with the use of practical exercises to support the lessons.

Details:
Sports hypnotherapy can help athletes to improve their performance to get to the absolute top of their chosen sport. It can be used to:

  • Reinforce established sporting goals
  • Increase motivation
  • Improve bodily awareness
  • Handle nervousness
  • Manage stress
  • Be able to relax
  • Ignore distractions
  • Control pain

The session will look at how the brain works and common problems that athletes face – choking, dartitis, yips, target panic, etc – and talk about paralysis by analysis, and how it can be avoided, and dealing with negativity.

We’ll look at different types of visualization and how they can be used to improve performance both in and out of trance.

We’ll look at relaxation both away from events and at events. We’ll look at the kind of language to use. And we’ll look at practice in and out of trance. We’ll look at getting ‘in the zone’.

We’ll talk about Mihály Csíkszentmihályi’s idea of flow – the mental state of operation in which a person performing an activity is fully immersed in a feeling of energized focus, full involvement, and enjoyment in the process of the activity.

And we’ll look at Owen Schaffer’s seven flow conditions. We will also look at hypnotherapy and NLP techniques to bring all this together to help produce the best athlete possible.

And what works well for top athletes is also going to work well on aspiring athletes and everyday clients.


About the Lecturer

Trevor Eddolls
ihypno.biz

Trevor Eddolls is a Hypnotherapy Master Practitioner, and also a qualified solution-focused supervisor and an NLP Master Practitioner. He is a qualified Life Coach. He also has diplomas in Positive Psychology, Counselling, Nutrition, and Play Therapy.

Trevor is Head of IT and Social Media on the Executive of the Association for Solution-Focused Hypnotherapy (AfSFH).

He is a popular speaker and blogger, has a podcast, and has written eight books and numerous articles that have been published in a number of different hypnotherapy journals.

Trevor has successfully worked with clients for things like stress and anxiety, depression, phobias, becoming non-smokers, weight management, and performance – including Olympic-standard athletes.

CPHT Coffee Morning!

Come and join us on Friday 27th September between 11am and 2.30pm for Coffee and Cake (tea and other beverages available too). It will be a good opportunity to see what therapies we have available to you, find out more about our Solution Focused Hypnotherapy training and to raise some funds for a very worthy cause. Hope you can join us. The Clifton Practice, 8-10 Whiteladies Road, Clifton, Bristol. BS8 1PD. Tel: 0117 317 9278

Solution Focused Hypnotherapy

I am often asked the question ‘What is Solution Focused Hypnotherapy?’

Well, Solution Focused Hypnotherapy (SFH) is a model of excellence that uses interventions that are effective. It will use the very best procedures that science and research prescribe. In reality though its core philosophy is very much based on the work of Steve de Shazer and Insoo Kim Berg and the basic tenets of SFBT.

Hypnotherapy, and SFH is no exception, has a history of being associated with many forms of therapeutic practice. Often, but not always, this can be a force for good. What follows could be described as the foundation philosophies on which SFH is built. Dr James Braid (1795-1860), who could be thought of as the inventor of modern hypnotism, successfully created a blueprint that could be described as the original hypnotherapy model.

“He was best known in the medical world from his theory and practice of hypnotism, as distinguished from Mesmerism, a system of treatment he applied in certain diseases with great effect.” (Obituary. The Lancet 1860)

Braid’s influence and success was very much a result of his empirical and scientific approach. In effect he said that the clinical progress should be verified by research and related to the latest understanding of psychology. He attributed the success of trance to ordinary psychological or physiological factors such as focused attention, expectation, motivation and endeavour. SFH is very much based on Braid’s basic premise that mental focus on imagery and language mediates the physical and psychological effects of dominant ideas.

It would have appeared sensible to consolidate the work done by Braid and to capitalise on what worked. This was not to be the case. In late Victorian and post Victorian times ‘wackiness’ once more sabotaged the credible scientific clinical practice. Even worse, in the late 19th and most of the 20th Century the pseudo-scientific ‘hi-jacked’ hypnotherapy and kept it in a state, often a delusional state of stagnation.

Fortunately, as Robertson says in the ‘Complete Writings of James Braid “The Father of Hypnotherapy in the 21st Century”, “Braid’s ‘Common Sense’ and empirical orientation have become fashionable once again”‘.

Hypnotherapy was partially rescued from post-Victorian ‘quackery’ and later from Freudian ‘analytical’ theory by psychiatrist, Milton H Erickson. He practised as a hypnotherapist from the 1940’s until his death in the early 1980’s. Erickson’s ideas reached far beyond hypnotic technique. He posed radical ideas regarding the role of therapist and the competency of clients. Milton Erickson was convinced that everyone has a reservoir of wisdom and competency and emphasised the importance of accessing client’s resources and strengths. Major interest in his work gathered momentum in the 1970’s and early 1980’s. Erickson’s success and creativity spawned a variety of approaches. There was in particular great interest in one of his primary approaches entailing first learning the problem pattern and then prescribing a small change in the pattern.

Steve de Shazer’s first contact with psychotherapy happened when he read ‘Strategies of Psychotherapy’, the ideas and work of Erickson by Jay Haley. It has been said that this book coupled with the work of the Mental Research Institute (MRI) in Paolo Alto, formed the foundations for what would later be called Solution Focused Brief Therapy (SFBT).

The basic tenets of SFBT are well known and are different in many ways from traditional forms of treatment. It is a competency based model and the focus is on the clients’ desired future rather than on past problems or current conflicts. It assumes that no problems happen all the time, there are exceptions and that small changes can lead to large increments of change. The setting of specific, concrete and realistic goals is an important component. In SFBT it is the client that sets the goals. Once formulated the therapist will use a number of specific responding and questioning techniques to assist the client construct the steps that may be required to reach the ‘preferred future’. Solution Focused Hypnotherapists note Steve de Shazer’s often repeated assertion that solution work is “the same whatever problem the client brings”.

In the 1990’s modern technology led to what some have referred to as a sequel of the Copernican revolution. MRI, PET and CAT scans can photograph the brain. Electronic microscopes, the nuclear tagging of living human molecules and other biochemical investigative techniques, enable scientists to have an ever increasing understanding of how the brain works. With at least 500 therapeutic methods, all proffering special theories, techniques and philosophies, psychotherapy could be described as bordering on dysfunctional. The neuroscientific revolution beginning in the 1990’s and progressing with ever increasing vigour into the 21st Century has begun to give the field uncharacteristic coherence. Certainly the days when therapists could make things up have gone.

“For future generations of therapists training will certainly change” says Mary Sykes Wylie and Richard Simon, (Discoveries from Black Box 2002), “Curricula will have to face the accumulation of knowledge coming from neuroscientists… having an understanding of such clinical relevant areas of knowledge as neural networks and brain structures”.